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Max Abroad : The Best of Spain

Quite simply writing about the best things Spain has to offer and anything that might crop up along the way. Spain is a lot more than just sun, sand and sea...

Rooms with a view...
26 February 2016

The ruins of this ancient settlement exist only as a series of circular foundations, but what a view they had!

The village 'Castro de Baroña' was constructed not only in a strategic location but also one of incomparable natural beauty, surrounded by beautiful beaches and mountains. A completely excavated seaside example of a settlement dating from the first century BC to the first century AD (the Iberian Iron Age/Galician Castro Culture), it consists of 30 circular or oval stone houses within a double defensive wall. The settlement was not positioned in this isolated coastal spot simply to fend off attacks from the sea, but rather to defend itself from attacks from the mainland. It took full advantage of the protection afforded by it’s position, the defensive ramparts across the isthmus prevented attacks on land whilst a large, rocky cliff constituted an excellent sea defense.

 

 

Popular myth claims that these castros were inhabited by the "Praestamarcos" tribe and that it is actually on the "Vicu Sapcorum," an ancient Roman road that traversed the "Barbanza" hills, and was called "Per Loca Martimia." Whether this is actually true is hard to say, but it is claimed that people lived in this desolate spot for many centuries up until the arrival of the "Suevians."

It is difficult to determine what the site once looked like since there is no evidence of upper walls, roofs, windows or even doors. Some hypothesize that this was a storage settlement but most archaeologists posit that it was inhabited year-round since there is clear evidence of shellfish gathering and fishing. There is also a furnace located in the northern section which was probably used for smelting tin, gold, copper, and iron mined in the nearby mountains. The settlement could have been completely self-sufficient, except that no facilities to store fresh water have been found.

 

            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Like 1        Published at 13:01   Comments (1)


Madrid's Botanical Garden
08 February 2016

 

Founded by King Ferdinand IV's royal decree, the Real Jardín Botánico is a two-and-a-half centuries-old wonder, occupying 20-acres of lush terrain in the heart of Spain's capital city.

Housed in its current location since 1781 in a building designed by the same architectural team responsible for the Museo del Prado, the botanical garden was initially populated with over 2,000 specimens retrieved from all over the Iberian peninsula by botanist and surgeon José Quer. After implausibly surviving centuries worth of civil and international wars, the collection has expanded to over 90,000 flowers and plants (not counting its herbarium with a literal million specimens on its own) plus an estimated 1,500 trees.

Originally arranged according to the Linneaus method favored during the period, in which the specimens are categorized in terraces of import, today its expansive grounds have been rearranged in a fashion that makes more sense.

Visitors will find the Real Jardín Botanico has been divided into seven outdoor gardens and five indoor greenhouses. Each of these sections are arranged logically by theme, content, and nature of origin. Highlights include the "Terraza de Cuadros" – featuring a Japanese garden and a series of box-edged plots filled with medicinal, aromatic, and orchard-like plants arranged around a fountain – and a romantic, period-accurate garden arranged to echo an English garden bursting with trees and shrubs. 

 

Perhaps most fascinatingly of all, one of Real Jardín Botánico's greenhouses has the ability to recreate the desert climate, making it one of the very few places where visitors can experience an accurate desert experience without leaving continental Europe.



Like 2        Published at 10:25   Comments (1)


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