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Spain's Top 10

Simple...a series of lists rating Spain's top 10 in anything and everything...they may be lists compiled by independent reviewers or by myself....whichever, I hope you find them useful :-)

Spain's most endangered species
20 November 2014 @ 10:44

Ecologists in Action has warned that Spain's biodiversity is the most fragile in Europe with the greatest number of endangered species, they have urged government action to tackle the 'alarming' crisis of 'biodiversity destruction' in the country. Here are a list of the top 5 species most at risk.

 

1. Iberian Lynx

The Iberian lynx is the world's most endangered feline species. There are real fears that it may soon become the first cat species to become extinct for at least 2,000 years. They are categorized as critically endangered by many institutions, including the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. The Iberian lynx is a rabbit specialist with a low ability to adapt its diet. A sharp drop in the population of its main food source, a result of two diseases, contributed to the feline's decline. The lynx was also affected by the loss of scrubland, its main habitat, to human development, including changes in land use and the construction of roads and dams.
The Iberian lynx portrays many of the typical characteristics of lynxes, such as tufted ears, long legs, short tail, and a ruff of fur that resembles a "beard". Unlike its Eurasian relatives, the Iberian lynx is tawny colored and spotted. The coat is also noticeably shorter than in other lynxes, which are typically adapted to colder environments.

 

2. Iberian Wolf

The Iberian wolf differs from the more common Eurasian wolf with its slighter frame, white marks on the upper lips, the dark marks on the tail and a pair of dark marks in its front legs that give it its subspecies name, Signatus ("marked"). Males can weigh up to 40 kilograms, with females usually weighing between 20 and 30 kg. The Iberian wolf lives in small packs. It is considered to be beneficial because it keeps the population of wild boar stable. Until the 1900s the Iberian wolf inhabited the majority of the Iberian Peninsula. However, Spain's Francoist government started an extermination campaign during the 1950s and 1960s that wiped out the animals from all of Spain except the northwestern part of the country, where there is still a sizable population in Sierra de la Culebra. Similar policies in Portugal almost led to the extinction of the animal south of the Douro river, where there are still some surviving packs.

 

3. Cantabrian Brown bear

Cantabrian brown bear refers to a population of Eurasian brown bears (Ursus arctos arctos) living in the Cantabrian Mountains of Spain. Females weigh, on average, 85 kg but can reach a weight of 150 kg. Males average 115 kg though can weigh as much as 200 kg. The bear measures between 1.6 – 2m in length and between 0.90 -1m at shoulder height. In Spain, it is known as the Oso pardo cantábrico and, more locally, in Asturias as Osu. It is timid and will avoid human contact whenever possible. The Cantabrian brown bear can live for around 25–30 years in the wild.

 

4. The Spanish Imperial Eagle

The Spanish imperial eagle or Iberian imperial eagle is a threatened species of eagle that only occurs in central and south-west Spain, adjacent areas of Portugal and possibly northern Morocco[dubious – discuss], although the latter is disputed. Formerly,the Iberian imperial eagle was considered to be a subspecies of the eastern imperial eagle, but is now widely recognised as a separate species due to differences in morphology, ecology,and molecular characteristics.

The Spanish imperial eagle averages smaller, 2.5–3.5 kilograms (5.5–7.7 lb), 78–82 centimetres (31–32 in) in length and 180–210 centimetres (71–83 in) in wingspan, and darker than its eastern cousin, and is a resident species (eastern imperial is partially migratory). It feeds mainly on rabbits, but can prey on many other animals, such as partridges, rodents, hares, pigeons, crows, ducks and even small dogs. The species is classified as Vulnerable by IUCN. Threats include loss of habitat, human encroachment, collisions with pylons, and illegal poisoning. There has also been a decline in the rabbit populations, as a result of myxomatosis and other viral illnesses. The current population is estimated at less than 500.

 

5. Spanish Ibex

The Iberian ibex, Spanish ibex, Spanish wild goat, or Iberian wild goat (Capra pyrenaica) is a species of ibex with four subspecies. Of these, two can still be found on the Iberian Peninsula, but the remaining two are now extinct. The Portuguese subspecies became extinct in 1892 and the Pyrenean subspecies became extinct in 2000. An ongoing project to clone the Pyrenean subspecies resulted in one clone being born alive in January 2009. This is the first taxon to become "un-extinct", although the clone died a few minutes after birth due to physical defects in lungs.

The Iberian ibex Capra pyrenaica populates the Iberian Peninsula and consisted originally of four subspecies. However with recent extinctions occurring within the last century, only two of the subspecies still exist.These two subspecies of ibexes, the Capra pyrenaica hispanica and the Capra pyrenaica victoriae, can be found along the Spanish Iberian Peninsula and have even migrated and settled into the coast of Portugal.

 



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17 Comments


foxbat said:
20 November 2014 @ 10:44

Wonderful thought but with Spains attitude to Hunting things can only get worse. Spain actively supports hunting to the extent of prohibiting walkers and cyclists from public footpaths and common land during the hunting season. Wolves are seen almost as vermin to be destroyed at all costs...
What is needed is a complete reversal of the laws on hunting with hunting itself ultimately banned completely. But it wont happen; there are too many people with too much money involved for whom hunting is a 'sport'.


Fartharder said:
20 November 2014 @ 21:39

I think money has very litle to do with it in Spain. Almost everyone here has a Suzuki Vitara and a rifle. Hunting is regulated and restricted to certain months but it does need a major overhaul and at the very least, many more restrictions put on it.


Hephaestus said:
21 November 2014 @ 14:00

I'm an airgun target shooter, so know my way around guns, if a farmer shoots a fox for killing his/her chickens, it's just part of the job. However if someone from the city claims that they shoot foxes because they are vermin they are lying, they shoot them because it gives them pleasure.

Being able to hit a five pence piece shot after shot at 35 yards gives me all the pleasure that I need out of shooting, someone killing a wolf for fun fills me with anger, but there are many that would have an orgasm whilst doing so.

Protect our endangered species, you never know we might just be one sooner than you think.


catalanbrian said:
22 November 2014 @ 08:38

What I find astonishing is that none of these animals are protected by the law. I understand that it is not illegal to shoot these animals, even in National parks. That is just crazy


tania said:
22 November 2014 @ 13:07

The Iberian Lynx is fighting back - see The Guardian 14July 2013
Ten years ago the Iberian lynx was nearing extinction but today, thanks to an imaginative conservation programme that has brought hunters, farmers and the tourist industry under its wing, its numbers have tripled from 94 to 312.


Chris Gamble said:
27 December 2014 @ 10:16

The impact of politics even affects wildlife in Spain. Amazing that so many awesome wild creatures are under threat of extinction in Spain and, that until very recently, were omnipresent. Sad really. Hope they dan be reintroduced like the Red Kite in England. Be great if more eagles could return to the rock of Gibraltar.


Chris Gamble said:
27 December 2014 @ 10:16

The impact of politics even affects wildlife in Spain. Amazing that so many awesome wild creatures are under threat of extinction in Spain and, that until very recently, were omnipresent. Sad really. Hope they dan be reintroduced like the Red Kite in England. Be great if more eagles could return to the rock of Gibraltar.


Wikepedia info said:
15 October 2016 @ 23:22

On the Conservation status it is nearly threatened. The wolf is close to endagered but not endagered


Trevor Lawrance said:
08 April 2017 @ 23:40

Catalanbrian is wrong in his comment of 22 November 2014, under E.U. Habitates Directive, all the animals mentioned, i.e. wolves, brown bears eat are protected species in ALL member states. Unfortunately, roe and fallow deer and wild boar are not protected at present except in National Parks. If you see anyone shooting in a SAC or a National Park it should be reported to the police. There is a special department in police forces in each country that deal with this problem. You have to push them though to get a prosecution.


Alvaro said:
26 January 2018 @ 15:39

O


Sad said:
08 March 2018 @ 19:00

It is sad that people kill for their own greed and self worth. They believe other living, breathing creatures deserve to die for their own greed. I guess that's why they call it one of the Seven Deadly Sins.


Sad said:
08 March 2018 @ 19:00

It is sad that people kill for their own greed and self worth. They believe other living, breathing creatures deserve to die for their own greed. I guess that's why they call it one of the Seven Deadly Sins.


Bob the bulider said:
26 March 2018 @ 23:40

Its so sad what people do to these animals i hope that they dont die out


p said:
17 April 2018 @ 12:36

pp


speciesPROtecter13579 said:
17 December 2018 @ 16:24

Let's save these endangered animals. Stop killing precious animals they deserve a home


my name jeff said:
06 January 2019 @ 18:04

leave these animals alone we all belong on earth


fortniteking said:
06 January 2019 @ 18:06

these stupid people keep murdering earths animals



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