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IAN & SPAIN

WELCOME TO MY BLOG. HAVING LIVED IN SPAIN FOR OVER TWENTY YEARS I HAVE TRULY MANAGED TO IMMERSE MYSELF IN THE LOCAL CULTURE AND FEEL TOTALLY INTEGRATED. I WILL BE WRITING ABOUT MY PASSION FOR SPANISH FOOD AND DRINK AS WELL AS ITS CULTURE, PEOPLE AND PLACES OF SPECIAL INTEREST. PLEASE FEEL FREE TO LEAVE A COMMENT.

Extra Virgin Olive Oil, it does a lot more than you may realise...
Tuesday, February 8, 2022 @ 6:53 PM

 

Studies published by the OHIS (Olive Health Information System in partnership with the University of Navarra School of Medicine) confirm that as soon as we eat olive oil it has a number of effects all the way along the digestive system. As far back as ancient times, it was recommended for assorted digestive disorders, and its beneficial properties are now being corroborated by epidemiological studies and a wealth of scientific data.

When olive oil reaches the stomach it does not reduce the tone of the muscular ring or sphincter at the base of the oesophagus. Because of this, it reduces the risk of the flow or reflux of food and gastric juice up from the stomach to the oesophagus.

Olive oil also partially inhibits gastric motility. As a result, the gastric content of the stomach is released more slowly and gradually into the duodenum, giving a greater sensation of "fullness", and favouring the digestion and absorption of nutrients in the intestine.

One of the effects of olive oil on the hepato-biliary system is that it is a cholagogue, ensuring optimal bile drainage and full emptying of the gall bladder. Another effect is that it is cholecystokinetic, i.e. it stimulates the contraction of the gall bladder, which is extremely helpful in the treatment and prevention of disorders of the bile ducts. It stimulates the synthesis of bile salts in the liver and increases the amount of cholesterol excreted by the liver.

In short, owing to its beneficial effect on the muscle tone and activity of the gall bladder, olive oil stimulates the digestion of lipids, because they are emulsified by the bile, and it prevents the onset of gallstones.

When consumed, olive oil produces a small amount of secretion by the pancreas, making this organ "work" little, but efficiently and enough to carry out all its digestive functions. Olive oil is recommended in diseases where pancreatic function has to be maintained, such as pancreas failure, chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, malabsorption syndromes, etc.

Owing to the sitosterol it contains, olive oil partially prevents cholesterol absorption by the small intestine. It also stimulates the absorption of various nutrients (calcium, iron, magnesium, etc.).

Olive oil, therefore, is a fat that is digested and absorbed really well. It has excellent properties and a mild laxative effect that helps to combat constipation and bad breath.

 



Like 5




10 Comments


PablodeRonda said:
Wednesday, February 9, 2022 @ 7:16 AM

Excellent information. Many thanks.


jeffers45 said:
Wednesday, February 9, 2022 @ 8:01 AM

I really enjoy your posts Ian, including this one.
What would be really good for a post like this one would be to see some references to you sources,
Thanks for posting this - I'm a great fan of olive oil.


eos_ian said:
Wednesday, February 9, 2022 @ 8:13 AM

Hi, when it comes to health properties of olive oil the leading source I read is the Olive Health Information System (OHIS). It is a web-based project run jointly by the IOC( International Olive Council) and the University of Navarra School of Medicine and it is aimed at providing a permanently updated library of all scientific reports related to the health effects of olives, olive oil and other olive products.


eos_ian said:
Wednesday, February 9, 2022 @ 8:14 AM

Thanks for reading! I will add the source to the article, these types of articles I understand how they may raise questions. Appreciate the comment.





John said:
Wednesday, February 9, 2022 @ 10:48 PM

And only 40 years ago, we thought the only benefit was to rub it on your skin and lay in the sun.


watchmanager said:
Saturday, February 12, 2022 @ 9:02 AM

Very informative but I couldn't see anywhere how much to take and how to take it.
Other than putting on salad or frying is he advocating taking it as a 'shot'.
I did see local Spaniards last week, whilst having their morning cafè break, have such a shot. Presumedly it being olive oil.


crostrad said:
Saturday, February 12, 2022 @ 11:36 AM

Ian, I would be interested to know if you get the same beneficial results from eating olives.
Another good " food for thought" article, thanks for publishing


eos_ian said:
Saturday, February 12, 2022 @ 11:53 AM

It is generally considered that a small shot glass of olive oil a day is sufficient. All references to olive oil refer to uncooked raw EVOO.


eos_ian said:
Saturday, February 12, 2022 @ 12:00 PM

Hi Crostad, you can't really compare the two as they effectively have very little in common at the end of the day.

Olives, which have to be cured in order to be edible, usually contain a lot of sodium while olive oil is virtually sodium-free.

The curing process removes a lot of the polyphenols in olives whereas these are largely preserved in extra virgin olive oil. Thus the health benefits are very much reduced compared to EVOO.

Whole olives provide some fibre; olive oil does not. But no one really eats olives to increase their fibre intake.

Olive oil is 100% fat whereas olives are about 20% fat. All in all, I would say Olives are a healthy snack if eaten in moderation, due to the salt content, but never a substitute for EVOO.








crostrad said:
Saturday, February 12, 2022 @ 8:18 PM

Hi Ian, thanks for pointing out the different properties between olives and olive oils. Since we gave up the house in Spain we seem to have cut down on eating olives in the uk (probably something to do with colder temperatures). We do use olive oil for cooking everything - even deep frying the breakfast eggs.
Hope we can get back to Spain sometime soon, we really miss the food.


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