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Journey To A Dream

In May 2002 my wife and I journeyed from Huddersfield in England's industrial north to rural Galicia. Join us on our journey and immerse your senses in the sights, sounds, and tastes of this remote and little known region of Spain.

The Some-day Supplement - issue 2
20 July 2017 @ 14:20

Note from the editor - Welcome back to issue 2 of The Some-day Supplement. In today's issue we mix food with love and discover that pies in paradise doesn't always end in love. 
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Canabal Cuisine - Lemon Curd
Ingredients
The juice and grated rind of a lemon
75gms sugar
50gms unsalted butter
2 large eggs
 
 
Method

Place the lemon rind and sugar in a bowl.
In another bowl whisk the eggs and lemon juice then pour the liquid over the sugar.
Cut the butter into small pieces and add them to the bowl.
Place the bowl over a pan of barely simmering water.
Stir continuously until the mixture becomes thick. This can take about 20 minutes. If you try to rush the egg whites cook and you get white lumps in your lemon curd.
Once the lemon curd is cool put it in a jar.
 
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Travel
 
Salamanca – Spain’s seat of learning
 
The city of Salamanca in the region of Castile and León has gained the reputation as the one of the most romantic cities in Spain.
 
 
Formed in part by the street musicians who serenade young women in the Plaza Mayor. Known as La Tuna the groups of players are made up of university students. It’s a tradition that dates back to the thirteenth century when scholars from poorer backgrounds would sing outside bars in exchange for food. Today’s academics prefer to buy their own meals from the tips they receive.
 
 
For lovers of history, art, and architecture, Salamanca is a dream. Not content with one cathedral, Salamanca has two. The first, was built in the twelfth century. The latest was completed in the eighteenth. To enter these monuments of Catholicism, visitors are asked to pay a fee which although small (€4.75 when we visited) seem a little mean spirited.
 
 
The two cathedrals are linked by Patio Chico, one of the most eye-catching corners of the city. 
 
 
One of the city’s more appealing attributes, especially to a Yorkshire pie eater like myself, is the Hornazo de Salamanca. Weighing in at over a kilo, this colossus of meat pies is packed with the finest iberico pork and hard-boiled eggs.
 
 
Salamanca is a bustling, lively city with visitors from all over the world. Students rush along narrow streets, no doubt late for lectures, and groups of foreign school children look vacant as their teacher guides them through the historic alleyways. On the day that we visited (May 18th) the weather was grey and overcast. Not ideal for photography but very comfortable for taking in the sights.
 

People say that romance is dead; I disagree. Whether Salamanca is a shining example of it, I’m not too sure. I’ll let you decide. One thing is certain, for anyone planning a tour of Spain, Salamanca is a must-see city.
 

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And Finally - #normalwisdom
 
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​This Canabal Chronicle Some-day supplement was brought to you by Craig Briggs (with a little help from wife Melanie) author of The Journey series of books.

To purchase copies of my books, click these titles:

Journey To A Dream - Beyond Imagination - Endless Possibilities

 

Find out more about Craig, and Galicia or look him up on Facebook

 

Craig and Melanie also own and operate a luxury farmhouse rental property called Campo Verde. To find out more about a stay at Campo Verde and Galicia in general, visit their website getaway-galicia


It’s best eaten within a week – it never lasts so long in our house.


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