All EOS blogs All Spain blogs  Start your own blog Start your own blog 

IAN & SPAIN

WELCOME TO MY BLOG. I WILL BE WRITING ABOUT SPANISH FOOD AND DRINK AND IN PARTICULAR MY OBSESSION FOR OLIVE OIL, ONE OF SPAIN'S MAJOR ASSETS AND GREATLY MISUNDERSTOOD BY THE MAJORITY OF CONSUMERS WORLDWIDE. I WILL ENDEAVOR TO PROVIDE YOU WITH ALL THE INFORMATION YOU NEED TO ENJOY THE WORLD OF OLIVE OIL WITHOUT BEING TAKEN FOR A RIDE! HOPE YOU ENJOY IT AND PLEASE LEAVE YOUR COMMENTS!

A recipe that will get anyone out of trouble
27 February 2015

 

I am not a great fish eater to be honest, it’s not really something I enjoy much so I don’t tend to cook it very often but tuna is an exception and  I can’t get enough of it!  Whether it is raw or cooked, doesn't bother me, I love it both ways. 

“Atun Encebollado” (Tuna with an onion reduction) is one of those recipes that can get you out of trouble on any occasion and saved me when I had to prepare a sudden dinner not so long ago. It is a quick fish recipe that we can enjoy either hot or cold and it is ever so easy to prepare. It is a really classic dish in Andalucía and especially in Barbate (the province of Cadiz). If you happen to pass through Barbate you must pay a visit to El Campero, one of the best restaurants in the area and one of the reasons I fell in love with “fresh tuna” many years ago. Never having been a fish eater, my tuna experience up to then was limited entirely to tinned tuna, believe it or not. If you like tinned tuna you will love fresh tuna, so you must give this recipe a go.

 

Tuna & Onion ingredients for 4 people:

4 thick tuna steaks (cut into rectangular blocks)
3 Onions
2 garlic cloves
Extra virgin olive oil
150 ml of white wine
100 ml fish stock
2 tsp. Paprika de Vera
1 Bay leaf
1 tsp. Oregano
1 tbsp  Sherry Vinegar.

Steps to take:

1. Peel and cut into thin slices the onions and garlic.
2. Add 6 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil to a saucepan.

3. Quickly seal the tuna steaks in the frying pan, just so they go white on the outside, don’t cook them. Remove straight away and put to one side.

4. Now add the onion and garlic and let them simmer on a low heat, stirring occasionally for about ten minutes.

5. When the onion is whitish and very soft, add the paprika de Vera and stir in quickly.

6. Almost immediately add the fish broth and then the wine and finally the bay leaf and the oregano.

7. Half cover the pan with the lid and cook on medium-low heat for another 15 minutes. After 5 minutes of cooking add the sherry vinegar and stir in.

8. Next place the tuna steaks back in and cook for a further 5 minutes.  The sauce should be thickening so the stock and wine should have reduced more or less by this point but not dried out. If you see it starting to dry out remove from the heat straight away or add a drop of fish stock and continue, but only if you want the tuna well cooked. These last 5 minutes will depend on your preferences, experiment! I like my tuna raw in the middle.
 (If the source is still too liquid then you could thicken it with a little flour, but brown the flour in a separate saucepan first and add a little stock from the onions, stir and blend in the saucepan and then pour it into the other pan)

9. Now just serve and enjoy.


If you are interested in the tuna traditions associated with Cadiz then you might find this other article of mine interesting: Red Tuna of Almadraba

 

 

 

 



Like 1        Published at 18:51   Comments (2)


Can I have a drop of olive oil in my cocktail please?
19 February 2015

Since the "craft cocktail movement" has been causing a stir, you’re about to notice olive oil finding it’s way into bars, if you haven’t already. The kitchen staple has been used for frying, drizzling, baking, dipping and much more, so why not cocktails? We are used to seeing olives on a stick, but what about in its liquid state, inside your drink?


Extra Virgin olive oil (especially a good quality Arbequina)  can blend very nicely with vodka and gin-based drinks to add a lovely, fruity twist. To take it even further, try mixing infused oils with spirits and take a simple beverage to a whole new level.

Please use an authentic extra virgin olive oil for this. If it comes in a plastic bottle, forget it. Look for the good stuff, that only comes in 500ml dark glass bottles. From that point on it will depend what you are prepared to pay, but expect top at 6 euros for 500ml. It will last some time as you will not be using much with each drink. (if you want more info on how to find the good olive oil read my article : How to recognise an authentic extra virgin olive oil

An olive oil cocktail can compliment foods beautifully, think basil and lemon paired with a white pizza, or rosemary and salt to accompany a classic duck recipe or roast.

Though you can easily experiment at home with your olive oil concoctions, restaurants and bars have already caught on to the olive oil cocktail craze.

Bars in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles are serving up a new comer called “Fig & Olive” which combined cucumber infused vodka, blood orange olive oil, egg white, simple syrup, celery, lime juice, and blood orange puree.  Sounds good enough to eat.

Another mix is the savory “Oliveto” made from olive oil, raw egg white, lemon, Licor 43 and Gordon’s Gin. Notice how both drinks contain egg whites, which act as an emulsifier with water and oil. That way the oil doesn’t separate. Here is the recipe for the Oliveto, and it's the world's simplest, most classic cocktail recipe - alcohol, citrus, sugar -  gilded in all the right ways with an emulsion of egg white and olive oil and the result is spectacular. (Marvel bar - Minneapolis) Prep time - 5 min. - Ingredients for 1 serving:

Other ingredients that mix well with EVOO are fruits, sugar, and flavored bitters.

So then, are you up to the task at home? You’ll need a little muscle to get the completed drink to your glass–– a hearty shake is necessary to blend the cocktail well and bring it to a foamy consistency. To finish, pour the olive oil creation into your barware of choice and sip away. 



Like 0        Published at 12:51   Comments (2)


Spam post or Abuse? Please let us know




This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse you are agreeing to our use of cookies. More information here. x